HOW TO DEFEAT A RELIGIOUS BULLY IN BOY SCOUTS: HELLENISMOS AND RELIGIO ROMANA EDITION

Cora here.  Over the years I’ve been contacted by parents of Cub Scouts or Boy Scouts wanting more information on how to navigate the religious topics (Duty to God) and the religious emblems that are starkly missing for our faith(s).

Recently I have had a few encounters with a not-so-friendly fella in regards to our family’s faith (Hellenic Romana-Americana Revivalist) and his “concerns” that our son, Thadd, would be unable to earn his Eagle because he doesn’t “believe in God”.

In response to this, I have devised a plan that will effectively shut up any further “concerns” in six easy steps.  I share with you all now in the hopes that if you ever need it, you have it.  I think this would be most effective as a Power Point or having each step printed on a sheet of paper to be presented one at a time.

HOW TO DEFEAT A RELIGIOUS BULLY IN BOY SCOUTS: HELLENISMOS AND RELIGIO ROMANA EDITION

STEP ONE:

Establish that in order for one to be a Boy Scout one must “Follow God” and that means one must believe in God.  Once this foundation is strong move onto to:

STEP TWO:

Read what BSA has to say on the subject of religion and belief in God:

The BSA does not seek to interpret God or religion. The Scout Oath states a requirement for a Scout to observe a duty to God, and the Scout Law requires a Scout to be reverent. Again, interpretation is the responsibility of the Scout, his parents and religious leaders.

 

A Scout is reverent. He is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties and respects the convictions of others in matters of custom and religion.

 

Read the definition of “reverent”:

rev(ə)rənt,ˈrevərnt/

adjective

  1. feeling or showing deep and solemn respect.

 

STEP THREE:

Reestablish “Follow God”.  Ask if one “Follows God” is it a logical conclusion that one “observes a duty to God” and is “reverent toward God”.

 

STEP FOUR:

Explain in very simple terms what the Delphic Maxims are. You may want to even explain it in terms of it being similar to a longer version of the 10 Commandments.  Explain that the Maxims are the backbone of your religious beliefs and is a moral compass.

Quote the famous “Know thyself” as an example of how well known and wise the Maxims are.  Quote a few more like: “Pursue Honor”, “Exercise Prudence”, “Praise those having arête”.

To strengthen the importance of the Maxims for your boy as a Scout, draw parallels between the Maxims and Boy Scouts.  A boy who has arête is a boy who knows to “do your best” (Cub Scout Motto).

 

STEP FIVE:

Show a list of the Maxims. It can be all, or it can be the top 5, 10, 20 or whatever number you choose. Just make sure they are in order.

Have the person read the number one Maxim out loud: “Follow God”.

 

STEP SIX:

Watch their head explode.

If they try to argue the validity of your concept of “God”, point back to what BSA says on that: The BSA does not seek to interpret God or religion.

Remind them that the important thing is that one needs to “Follow God”.

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